We Should All Be Feminists: Short but oh so interesting

We Should All Be Feminist by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie


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we-should-all-be-feminists


Synopsis:

What does “feminism” mean today? That is the question at the heart of We Should All Be Feminists, a personal, eloquently-argued essay—adapted from her much-viewed TEDx talk of the same name—by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the award-winning author of Americanah and Half of a Yellow Sun. 

With humor and levity, here Adichie offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century—one rooted in inclusion and awareness. She shines a light not only on blatant discrimination, but also the more insidious, institutional behaviors that marginalize women around the world, in order to help readers of all walks of life better understand the often masked realities of sexual politics. Throughout, she draws extensively on her own experiences—in the U.S., in her native Nigeria, and abroad—offering an artfully nuanced explanation of why the gender divide is harmful for women and men, alike. 

Argued in the same observant, witty and clever prose that has made Adichie a bestselling novelist, here is one remarkable author’s exploration of what it means to be a woman today—and an of-the-moment rallying cry for why we should all be feminists.


My thoughts:

I have never read anything by Adichie and I have to say I missed out. This book is short but really interesting.

In this book Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie talks of her experience of sexism growing up in Nigeria and how it has effected her life. This book discusses why we still need feminism and why each and every person should be a feminist. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie describes the deeply conditioned sexism she has encountered, beginning with her encounters with the label “feminist” growing up and drawing on her own experiences as well as those of other people in her life, male and female, young and old, Nigerian and American. Also Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie gives us an idea of what feminism is and isn’t. She address some major themes, such as; rigid traditional/cultural norms, the socialization of children and youth, concepts of masculinity and femininity, shaming of sexuality and self and of course, the power structures in favor of men.

For me it was a great introduction into the topic of feminism and gave a brief insight into how it can go unnoticed in society. I didn’t know much about what feminism really meant but consider me educated. Although most of what she says happened in Nigeria, a lot is happening al over the world. You can easily relate.

Even though this is a short book it packs a punch. Her deliberate, matter-of-fact style really drew me into the story. It convincingly lays down the arguments for feminism and also the reasons why the existing gender stereotypes are harmful.

I would recommend this book to everyone, men and women, who are interested in feminism.


Rating:

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City of Ashes: Action and adventure

City of Ashes By Cassandra Clare


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City of ashes


Synopsis:

Clary Fray just wishes that her life would go back to normal. But what’s normal when you’re a demon-slaying Shadowhunter, your mother is in a magically induced coma, and you can suddenly see Downworlders like werewolves, vampires, and faeries? If Clary left the world of the Shadowhunters behind, it would mean more time with her best friend, Simon, who’s becoming more than a friend. But the Shadowhunting world isn’t ready to let her go — especially her handsome, infuriating, newfound brother, Jace. And Clary’s only chance to help her mother is to track down rogue Shadowhunter Valentine, who is probably insane, certainly evil — and also her father.

To complicate matters, someone in New York City is murdering Downworlder children. Is Valentine behind the killings — and if he is, what is he trying to do? When the second of the Mortal Instruments, the Soul-Sword, is stolen, the terrifying Inquisitor arrives to investigate and zooms right in on Jace. How can Clary stop Valentine if Jace is willing to betray everything he believes in to help their father?


My thoughts:

I listened to this on audiobook. First and foremost I have to say I liked this one better then the first book. So much happens in this book, while a lot happened in City of Bones, I felt like the first book in the series was more about foundation laying.

This book centers around Clary Fray, a 15 year old girl from Brooklyn. In the first book she discovered she was a Shadownhunter. Now she wishes she weren’t one. She wishes she was normal. But what does normal even mean in a world were you can see Downwolders, like vampires, werewolf and faeries. Also being normal would mean not going after her father Valentine, the man who might know what to do with her mother. Valentine in the meantime is the man behind stealing the Mortal Instruments. The first book left him with the Mortal Cup. In this book he steals the Soul Sword, for what reason? You will find out when you read the book.

First of the characters. I, myself, like them all. Valentine is a very complex character. Does he feel love for his children or is he only after power? That’s the question that keeps going through your head. Another question that I think might go through you head is, is Valentine truly after power or is it more than that? Clary, Clary is feisty and smart. She isn’t just a normal fighting heroine, though. Compared to Jace, Isabel and Alec she hasn’t that much to offer. Not until we find out she has a special power. One that’s being greatly used. Speaking of Jace. We see a lot more from him in this novel. Not just the snarky side of him but the unsure, questioning side of him. I liked that a lot. That we saw a more vulnerable side. We didn’t see a lot of Alec and Isabel, especially Isabel. Alec at least had his thing with Magnus, another great character. I love Magnus. Even though he says there (Alec, Isabel, Clary, Luke etc.) not his friends he is always willing to help. Simon. Simon changes a lot during this book, especially towards the end. This has to do with the fact that he is not a mundane anymore. Finally Luke, being like a father for Clary you see him a lot throughout the book. What I recall about him is that he always sounds so wise. Individually these character were great but there interaction was great as well.

For me the plotline of City of Ashes was better than that of City of Bones. Like I said in the beginning, City of Bones set the foundation and City of Ashes build and expended on that. Since the first book was all about establishing the foundation and the ‘back story’ so to speak, this book was more about action and adventure. In City of Bones, Valentine, the villain of the story, had stolen one of the Mortal Instruments from the Shadowhunters. This is how the story ended. City of Ashes soon takes us to him getting another of the Mortal Instruments, the Soul Sword. From that moment on things start happening all around. The book builds up to an epic confrontation between Valentine and the gang in the end.

This brings me to the writing style. First off the over all pace of this book was quick. Second, Cassandra Clare is very descriptive in her writing. These florid descriptions are being used to good effect, crafting for example emotional tension and heart-wrenching romantic drama. I appreciated her writing style. You could literally picture everything she wrote. I wouldn’t say this to be a literary masterpiece but it was well crafted.


Rating:

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Everything, Everything: Heartwarming, real and tragic

Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon


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everything-everything


Synopsis:

My disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I’m allergic to the world. I don’t leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla.

But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He’s tall, lean and wearing all black—black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, and a black knit cap that covers his hair completely. He catches me looking and stares at me. I stare right back. His name is Olly.

Maybe we can’t predict the future, but we can predict some things. For example, I am certainly going to fall in love with Olly. It’s almost certainly going to be a disaster.


My thoughts:

This book revolves around Maddy, a teenager who’s spent her entire life shut off from the world due to a rare disease called severe combined immunodeficiency. SCID has weakened Maddy’s immune system to the point where any little thing can make her sick. She lives in a white life, reading books and interacting only with her mother and her nurse, Carla. Her father and brother tragically died when she was for months old. When a family moves into the house next door, Maddy wants to get to know them. Especially a boy called Olly. They eventually get to know each other trough for example IM. Maddy falls in love, but Maddy knows she’s stepping in dangerous waters. Can they ever truly be together given her disease?

First off the representation of SCID. I don’t know if it’s well represented since I don’t have the disease. I do have a mental illness and a lot of what was going through Maddy’s head, I got. Wishing things, wanting more out of live but not being able to get it. That sort of thing.

Maddy is a wonderful character. For a teenager with SCID, Maddy is remarkably grounded. She loves reading novels, has online tutors, and spends evenings playing games with her mother. You learn she is so grounded through the things she says, for example  “I am not lonely,” she tells her mom. “I am alone. Those are different things.” I found her to be so strong. To live with a disease that literally causes you to stay inside for the rest of your life and still find joy is quit remarkable. She wants not just to live, but to live a life worth remembering. I say this because I have a mental illness and finding joy in things for me is hard. I know there is a difference between SCID and a mental illness but still, their both diseases that can cripple you. Also something I loved was that Maddy is not the “typical” YA protagonist. If you are looking for a book with a diverse main character then look no further because Maddy is Japanese/African American. Olly. Another wonderful character. Olly spends his days hanging out on his roof and shielding his mother and younger sister from his alcoholic, abusive father. His protectiveness of the people he loves was what made me love him so much. Carla. Also great. Being there for Maddy ever since she was little and actually letting her experience things. Maddy’s mom. Maddy and her mom had such a great relationship, they did everything together. That was until .…

The plot. Nicola Yoon’s Everything, Everything is a complex and layered book. This book deals with what it’s like having to live with SCID, with romance and family but also with horrible things that can happen to families after for example a traumatic event. This book at the end had a major plot twist. One that was not expected. And I think that although your angry you also understand and are sympathetic. I think Nicola Yoon wanted people to feel both things since it reflects real life. People can do terrible things and you can understand their motivations but it doesn’t mean you have to like them.

The best thing about this book was how easy and quick of a read it is. While the majority of the book is written in prose, there are so many pages that have illustrations that fit with the story. I loved the fact that when you turned a page there was for example a diary entry of Maddy when she was younger or a drawing. I felt that through the illustrations you got to know Maddy’s personality a lot better. It really added charm and character to the novel.


Spoiler section:

First of I wish her mother’s illness had been named. I’m pretty sure she had Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy, not just “she’s too overprotective.” Naming it would spread awareness and be informative.

Their’s a lot of controversy surrounding the plot twist. For me, using a mental illness as a plot twist is a big no, no but in this case I get it. I myself think that many real children in this type of situation also do not know. They depend on their parent and take their word for it that they are sick. The fact that her mom’s illness was revealed to us along with Maddy felt very realistic of this situation.

Still though I get why others are kind of mad. For those who live with SCID or any other illness for that matter reading this might give them a non satisfactory feeling. Some might say a sick feeling. Since it can seem that people can only live a happy live when there is a plot twist that takes the disability away.

This was a hard book to review, since their some controversy surrounding it. Anyway for those of you who would like a swoon worthy romance, this is the book for you. For those of you who want to think and question, this is the book for you. Just read it and come back to me with your thoughts.


Rating

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Chew vol 1 Taster’s Choice: Fascinating, grotesque and not to be read whilst eating

Chew vol. 1 Taster’s Choice


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chew


Synopsis:

Tony Chu is a detective with a secret. A weird secret. Tony Chu is Cibopathic, which means he gets psychic impressions from whatever he eats. It also means he’s a hell of a detective, as long as he doesn’t mind nibbling on the corpse of a murder victim to figure out whodunit, and why. He’s been brought on by the Special Crimes Division of the FDA, the most powerful law enforcement agency on the planet, to investigate their strangest, sickest, and most bizarre cases.


My thoughts:

If have never read anything by John Layman, I have to say I really enjoyed this.

The story was unique, the characters were enjoyable, there was great flow to the action in between the various chapters, and the artwork had quality.

Chicken. A lot revolves around chicken. Eating chicken is outlawed and that’s a pretty important fact. Tony Chu is a detective that happens to be a Cibopathic. He can get psychic readings from whatever he eats. so, he can see the tree from which an apple grew or he can see the last squealing shudders of a pig just before death. A lot of times, it’s better not to know what’s been done to your food. On a stakeout, investigating a restaurant that illegally sells chicken, things go horribly wrong for Tonu Chu. He is suspended from the police force. In comes an agent from the F.D.A special crimes unit and overs him a job. Tony Chu not exactly knowing what this job entails begins his first day. His first day doesn’t start out very good. It’s turns out he is hired because of his ability and has to eat a finger that is decaying. At first he really doesn’t want to but after learning that his new partner is also an Cibopathic and gives him reasons for using his ability, he agrees to do it. Things start to hit the fan from there.

The characters, I liked them a lot. Tony is an earnest young cop who sticks to the rules, a little hot-headed but okay. Mason, Tony’s partner, is a guy that does the opposite, also he is badass. Then there is the lovely Amelia. She is a sabocrivner, which means she writes about food and the people reading about it literally taste what the meal should have tasted like. She had such character. She had spunk. I loved that about her. Then their is Mike. He is the funniest. He hates Tony Chu and goes out of his way to let him now. He even thinks about letting him get killed but the paperwork stopped him haha.

The plot was amazing, it has got mystery, action, romance and intrigue. It was a unique read. Although John Layman provides food as a major theme of this graphic novel, the plot of the story is basically a crime drama that involves the murders of many people who are involved in the food market. I love myself a crime book so this was right up my ally. Why was it unique? Because of the superpowers that had to do with food. For example Tony’s cannibalism. However gruesome it was also really interesting.

The writing was amazing to. I found this book funny as hell and that’s mostly because of the dialogue. Loved the dialogue. Also loved the way that John Layman created a mysterious and dark atmosphere for this comic. Although gross at times this graphic novel was so exciting and creative that I couldn’t put it down. I was drawn into the surreal world John Layman created and the plot twists that this graphic novel so easily provided.

What I liked best about this would be the artwork. I have to say I don’t know much about artwork but this had to be my favorite of the three graphic novels I have read. The artwork was vivid and it was full of life. The drawings were spot on and complemented the story perfectly. Gruesome scenes were truly horrific.

What’s left to say is that I am hooked and hungry for more. I can’t wait to read more of this series. Hope you will to.


Rating:

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Locke and Key vol 1. Welcome to Lovecraft: dark, twisted and gruesome.

Locke and Key vol. 1 Welcome to Lovecraft


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locke-and-key


Synopsis:

Locke & Key tells of Keyhouse, an unlikely New England mansion, with fantastic doors that transform all who dare to walk through them. Home to a hate-filled and relentless creature that will not rest until it forces open the most terrible door of them all …


My thoughts:

This is the first thing I’ve read by Joe Hill, and I have to say that I’m very impressed.

The book starts of with two teens murdering Mr. Locke and shattering the lives of his wife and their three children, Ty, Kinsey and Bode. In the aftermath of this terrible event,  the four travel to the town of Lovecraft, Massachusetts, to live at Key House. This is the families ancestral home. Moving to Key House might not have been such a good idea since things start to take a turn for the weird. For example, you have lots of doors that need certain keys. Including one that makes you into a ghost, one that changes your gender and one that lets you go anywhere.  There is also someone or something living in the well. To make matters even worse, it turns out that the murder of Mr. Locke was not a random act of violence, and the family will find itself beset by nightmares both human and not human while they try and grief but also try and find some semblance of a life.

Positives: 

The character development is outstanding.  Each chapter or so focusses on another character and in this chapter you learn so much about that person. So much so that you see them as real people. Real people that develop and grow overtime. Each and every character deals with there grief in their own way. Mom is drinking too much, Ty is crushed with guilt and contemplating suicide, Kinsey is withdrawn and tormented by the bloody memories of that fateful day and Bode, at age six is still too young to understand all the implications of the events the family is going through. That’s why he, while the rest of the family is to busy with what their going through, explores the house and it’s surroundings and finds the hidden doors and special keys as well as the entity captive at the bottom of a well on the estate. Although I fell in love with each and every one of these characters, and really felt for them. I must say Bode was my favorite.  His adventurous nature was what drew me into the story in the first place.

Plot-wise this book was fantastic. It dealt with so many things. It explored the searing pain of grief and the love of family. On top of that it dealt with some sinister things. Secret doors that open with special keys and make you into a ghost or changes your gender. A murderer that, for whatever reason, is still after the Locke family.  A face-changing entity that might be the mastermind of evil that is attacking the Locke family indirectly and so on.

Both the writing style as the art style were in my opinion amazing. They complemented each other perfectly. Gabriel Rodriquez art style supports the story Joe Hill wants to portray. So much of this story is character driven that’s why it’s so amazing that Rodriquez can draw the characters faces so expressively. They convey loads of emotion. Not only the characters are drawn well also  the backgrounds are amazing. You can see Rodriguez devotes his time and energy on making this images. Joe Hill’s great dialogue with Rodriguez’s visual storytelling makes this an incredible read.

Negatives:

What I didn’t like though where the shifting of timelines here. It confused me a lot. Maybe this had to do with the graphic novel format but I didn’t care for it.


Rating

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Vision of Silver: Slow moving, tragic and real

 

Vision in Silver by Anne Bishop


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vision-in-silver


Synopsis:

The Others freed the  cassandra sangue  to protect the blood prophets from exploitation, not realizing their actions would have dire consequences. Now the fragile seers are in greater danger than ever before—both from their own weaknesses and from those who seek to control their divinations for wicked purposes. In desperate need of answers, Simon Wolfgard, a shape-shifter leader among the Others, has no choice but to enlist blood prophet Meg Corbyn’s help, regardless of the risks she faces by aiding him.

Meg is still deep in the throes of her addiction to the euphoria she feels when she cuts and speaks prophecy. She knows each slice of her blade tempts death. But Others and humans alike need answers, and her visions may be Simon’s only hope of ending the conflict.

For the shadows of war are deepening across the Atlantik, and the prejudice of a fanatic faction is threatening to bring the battle right to Meg and Simon’s doorstep …


My thoughts

I really wanted to read this book , since I fell in love with this series from the start. Sadly I have to say, I liked this one but compared to the first two books it was a bit of a letdown.

Vision in Silver is the third book in an urban fantasy series about a world mostly divided into humans and the terra indigene, commonly known as The Others. These Others include shapeshifters (such as werewolves and crows), vampires, elementals, and harvesters. Humans can be divided as well. For example their are the intuits and there are the cassandra sangue. In this urban fantasy series the cassandra sangue play an important roll. Cassandra sangue are females who can see visions of the future after self-mutilation.

In the first book these girls were kept in compounds, tied up, and often raped or brutalized in other ways. Their visions were sold to interested parties. There was one however, her name Meg Corbyn, who escaped the compound and ended up in lakeside, a place where the Others live. She encounterd Simon Wolfgard, a wolf and the leader of the Others. Simon and those around him protect Meg from the outside dangers as well as from herself. Why from herself? The visions Meg has don’t go without cost. The tragic thing about being a cassandra sangue is that when you cut yourself a thousand times you die.

In the second book a criminal organization arose which sold the blood of the cassandra sangue as a street drug to make people go on homicidal rages. Seen as a threat to all species, the Others,  with the help of sympathetic humans set the girls free wherever they could. The would no longer be held in captivaty. They would no longer be used and abused.

Vision in Silver starts of with Meg having a vision of certain cassandra sague being dumped at the side of the road. Again Simon, Meg, the Others as well as the sympathetic humans try and find these blood prophets and help them. Helping them, however, turns out not to be that easy. Meg, herself, is still adjusting to living a normal life. How will the other cassandra sangue do. For the blood prophets the world is a frightening and unknown place, to many stimuli will drive them insane. Meanwhile, there are rumors of a dark faction of humans rising up against the Others. The Humans First and Last Movement, already introduced in the first book, is gaining ground. Lastly there are the Elders, The Elders are the oldest and most powerful of the Others. They are appalled by the Human First and Last movement as well as with the people who treated the cassadra sangue as they did. The rest of the Others know, push the Elders to far and the humans will be annihilated. All lead to Simon needing Meg and her prophecies once again, this regardless of the risks she is taking by aiding him.

Meg is an interesting character. I, myself, love her to pieces. She is not your typical heroine.  She is actually pretty fragile, doesn’t have a lot of world experience and is constantly being protected by the terra indigene, especially Simon. Simon also is very lovable. Why, because he is flawed in an adorable way. He often fails to understand the human way of things. He tries, though. He tries real hard, this so to help Meg. This books is told from a large cast of characters. This was a problem for me since it made me not connect to some of the characters as much as I would have liked. Additionally, the different storylines need to be equally interesting. Through the first part of the book I found myself wanting to rush through the less interesting parts and back to the interesting ones. I felt the story got dragged out a bit.

World-building. Anne Bishop is a queen when it comes to world-building. She has created a magical world that still at it’s core has to be called realistic. It’s simple yet complex. And dark, so, so dark. The fact that in this book the blood prophets with unwanted babies were thrown out of their compounds hit me like a ton of bricks. As well as the fact that some already born babies were dumped in water. Perhaps the interesting part of this world is that rolls are reversed. Not the supernatural creatures are raking havoc. The human are the ones to look out for. Their the ones that push to violence.

Bishops writing is beautiful. They fit the characters so well. For example Meg as an almost childlike feel to her, this because she has no world experience.  Not only does it fit the characters well, it also creates a nice balance between seriousness and humor. Like is said earlier the terra indigene’s attempts at understanding humans are met with laughter. Also Bishops draws the reader in with her vivid descriptions and rich detailing. You just can’t look away, your glued to the pages. Again I have to say this, for me, wasn’t always the case. Their were parts I would have gladly skipped over.

Although Vision in Silver has a plot with multiple threads that weave together, I can’t help but feel that this book was an in between book. Yes, Meg is having difficulties living outside of the compound, meanwhile she has to help the other cassandra sangue adept to live in the real world. They find in difficult and need Meg to guide them, if not for her help they would go insane and possibly kill themselves. Yes, there is a slow-burn romance building between Simon and Meg. Yes, the Humans First and Last movement is stirring up trouble. Yes, we see change from Simon concerning “some humans,” and yes, the Elders are not happy with how things between the Others and the humans are going. One wrong move from the human side and they will be eradicated. Still I found something lacking, something the other books had tons of. Suspense, this book felt kinda lackluster. Nothing really happened until the end of the book.

What’s left to say other then although I didn’t enjoy this book as much as the other two. You should still definitely check out this series. Overall it’s a great series!


Rating

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One: Fast-paced, heartbreaking and insightful

One by Sarah Crossan


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one


Synopsis:

Grace and Tippi are twins – conjoined twins. And their lives are about to change.
No longer able to afford homeschooling, they must venture into the world – a world of stares, sneers and cruelty. Will they find more than that at school? Can they find real friends? And what about love? But what neither Grace or Tippi realises is that a heart-wrenching decision lies ahead. A decision that could tear them apart. One that will change their lives even more than they ever imagined …


My thoughts:

This is my first ever Sarah Crossan read. I was interested in this book because, as the synopsis says, this is about conjoined twins. I wanted to know more about the physical/medical implications and the emotional/psychological aspect of being conjoined twins. I have to say I wasn’t prepared for how amazing a book this is.

To start at the beginning. This wonderful story is about sixteen-year-old twins, Grace and Tippi. They’re conjoined twins. As if life for them isn’t difficult enough, they must leave their sheltered, homeschooled life for a life in which the are judged, they are actually feared, pitied, whispered about and openly stared at. Why must they leave their sheltered life behind? Because their mother loses her job and their already unemployed Dad can’t stay away from alcohol. Bills are starting to pile up. Their parents can’t afford for them to be homeschooled anymore, they have to go to an actual school. At there new school they quickly make two friends: Yasmeen, who is HIV positive, and Jon, who lives a hard life as well. His mom left him.This group of outsiders skip school and go smoking and drinking. This goes to show that the are just like any other teenagers. Doing stuff that is “forbidden”. The only difference is that Grace feels resentment when Tippi wants to drink and smoke. Grace finds herself wanting to have control of her own body, wanting to make her own decisions. What you see are two very different people, with different thoughts and dreams, with different wants, who can’t stay annoyed with one another since the are literally joined at the hip. An example of this fact is that Tippi, when Grace has the flu, is confined to bed beside her even though she is perfectly healthy. This attack of the flu, meanwhile, leaves the twins in failing health. Separation, however dangerous, may well be the thing to save them. The question is, what will they choose.

This novel is written from Grace’s point of view. While reading I always thought, why did Sarah Crossan not include Tippi’s point of view. Although you get to know al lot by reading about Grace’s thoughts. Her fears surrounding their medical condition and the nature of their existence as well as her worries surrounding love and friendship. And since she empathizes with her sister, you get to know a bit about what’s going on in Tippi’s head as well. I still could not help but think that when Sarah Crossan also had included Tippi’s point of view, you would feel the full emotional and psychological impact of being a conjoined twin. I thought we didn’t get to know  Tippi as well as we possibly could have. I craved to know more about Tippi, and what drove her to say the thins she said. How did she feel about being an conjoined twin, about going to an actual school, making friends and about the decision they made. The end of the book made it clear though. This had to be in Grace’s point of view. It was her story to tell. And by only letting her tell it, the story was so much more. It made it that much more a sad and moving story.

This book is written in free verse. Something I wasn’t expecting and certainly had to get used to. Once I got used to it, I found it beautiful. Sarah Crossan can put al lot of emotion in just a few words. She can touch readers with meaningful anecdotes. The fact that it’s been written in free verse might make this book a more emotional read then it otherwise would have been. Due to it’s poetic style this book is a very quick read. Although I read it in more then one sitting, in total it took me only 2 hours to read.

This book covers so many things. When you look at Grace and Tippi. It covers what it is like to live your everyday life as conjoined twins, the difficulty of fitting in, what it’s like to live as one person but actually be two individuals, with the question do they stay conjoined or do they separate and with the fact what being separated actually would mean for the both of them.  Not only Grace and Tippi are well fleshed out characters also the side-characters felt very real. Grace and Tippi have a dad that is an alcoholic, a sister with anorexia, a best friend that has HIV and one that was left by his mother. I found this an important aspect of the book because it’s true to life. When you look around you, you must know someone that has to deal with something, something difficult. That unfortunately is life.

What’s left to say is that this is a beautiful book, a definite must read. It’s a book that will stay with you for a long, long time. A book that’s true to life. So many people in the world live with a disability and/or medical condition. It’s important that there are people around to write about these things. This, so we will learn more about the issue and thus more about the world and the people in it. I, myself, learned a lot from this book.


Rating:

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