Diversity spotlight Thursday

There is a lot more diversity in books these days and that’s great. You can read a book about a bisexual character, you can read about mental illness, about what it’s like to be a person of colour and so on. Still though there need to be more diverse books. It’s incredibly important that stories with diverse characters are emphasized. For both children, young adults and adults to read literature and see themselves reflected in what there reading. I myself want to read more diversely. And so I’am participating in the meme created by bookshelves and paperbacks. This is a weekly meme that will feature three books.

1.  A diverse book you have read and enjoyed;
2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read;
3. A diverse book that has not yet been released.


Cinder

cinder


Goodreads | Bookdepository


Sixteen-year-old Cinder is considered a technological mistake by most of society and a burden by her stepmother. Being cyborg does have its benefits, though: Cinder’s brain interference has given her an uncanny ability to fix things (robots, hovers, her own malfunctioning parts), making her the best mechanic in New Beijing. This reputation brings Prince Kai himself to her weekly market booth, needing her to repair a broken android before the annual ball. He jokingly calls it “a matter of national security,” but Cinder suspects it’s more serious than he’s letting on.
Although eager to impress the prince, Cinder’s intentions are derailed when her younger stepsister, and only human friend, is infected with the fatal plague that’s been devastating Earth for a decade. Blaming Cinder for her daughter’s illness, Cinder’s stepmother volunteers her body for plague research, an “honor” that no one has survived.
But it doesn’t take long for the scientists to discover something unusual about their new guinea pig. Something others would kill for.


I adored this book. I flew through it. You should definitely check this one out if you haven’t already.


Of Fire and Stars

of-fire-and-stars


Goodreads | Bookdepository


Betrothed since childhood to the prince of Mynaria, Princess Dennaleia has always known what her future holds. Her marriage will seal the alliance between Mynaria and her homeland, protecting her people from other hostile lands. But Denna has a secret. She possesses an Affinity for fire—a dangerous gift for the future queen of a kingdom where magic is forbidden.

Now, Denna must learn the ways of her new home while trying to hide her growing magic. To make matters worse, she must learn to ride Mynaria’s formidable warhorses—and her teacher is the person who intimidates her most, the prickly and unconventional Princess Amaranthine—called Mare—the sister of her betrothed.

When a shocking assassination leaves the kingdom reeling, Mare and Denna reluctantly join forces to search for the culprit. As the two become closer, Mare is surprised by Denna’s intelligence and bravery, while Denna is drawn to Mare’s independent streak. And soon their friendship is threatening to blossom into something more.

But with dangerous conflict brewing that makes the alliance more important than ever, acting on their feelings could be deadly. Forced to choose between their duty and their hearts, Mare and Denna must find a way to save their kingdoms—and each other.


I am beyond excited for this book. A girl betrothed to the prince but falling for the princess, what’s not to love?


Meg and Linus

Meg and Linus


Goodreads | Bookdepository


Can friendship, Star Trek, drama club, and a whole lot of coffee get two nerdy best friends through the beginning of their senior year of high school?

Meg and Linus are best friends bound by a shared love of school, a coffee obsession, and being queer. It’s not always easy to be the nerdy lesbian or gay kid in a suburban town. But they have each other. And a few Star Trek boxed sets. They’re pretty happy.

But then Sophia, Meg’s longtime girlfriend, breaks up with Meg. Linus starts tutoring the totally dreamy new kid, Danny—and Meg thinks setting them up is the perfect project to distract herself from her own heartbreak. But Linus isn’t so sure Danny even likes guys, and maybe Sophia isn’t quite as out of the picture as Meg thought she was. . . .

From crowdsourced young adult imprint Swoon Reads comes Meg & Linus by Hanna Nowinski, a fun friendship story about two quirky teens who must learn to get out of their comfort zones and take risks—even if that means joining the drama club, making new friends, and learning how to stand on your own.


A book were friendship takes center stage is always good in my book haha.


Connect with me elsewhere:

Goodreads | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Diversity spotlight Thursday

There is a lot more diversity in books these days and that’s great. You can read a book about a bisexual character, you can read about mental illness, about what it’s like to be a person of colour and so on. Still though there need to be more diverse books. It’s incredibly important that stories with diverse characters are emphasized. For both children, young adults and adults to read literature and see themselves reflected in what there reading. I myself want to read more diversely. And so I’am participating in the meme created by bookshelves and paperbacks. This is a weekly meme that will feature three books.

1.  A diverse book you have read and enjoyed;
2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read;
3. A diverse book that has not yet been released.


City of Bones

city-of-bones


Goodreads | Bookdepository


When fifteen-year-old Clary Fray heads out to the Pandemonium Club in New York City, she hardly expects to witness a murder― much less a murder committed by three teenagers covered with strange tattoos and brandishing bizarre weapons. Then the body disappears into thin air. It’s hard to call the police when the murderers are invisible to everyone else and when there is nothing―not even a smear of blood―to show that a boy has died. Or was he a boy?

This is Clary’s first meeting with the Shadowhunters, warriors dedicated to ridding the earth of demons. It’s also her first encounter with Jace, a Shadowhunter who looks a little like an angel and acts a lot like a jerk. Within twenty-four hours Clary is pulled into Jace’s world with a vengeance, when her mother disappears and Clary herself is attacked by a demon. But why would demons be interested in ordinary mundanes like Clary and her mother? And how did Clary suddenly get the Sight? The Shadowhunters would like to know … 


Although reading it the second time was less fun then the first time, I still enjoyed it. The world Cassandra Clare created is wonderful. The characters are great and the plot is fast-paced and entertaining. I was never bored.  There were lots of twists and turns.


The sun is also a star


Goodreads | Bookdepository


Natasha: I’m a girl who believes in science and facts. Not fate. Not destiny. Or dreams that will never come true. I’m definitely not the kind of girl who meets a cute boy on a crowded New York City street and falls in love with him. Not when my family is twelve hours away from being deported to Jamaica. Falling in love with him won’t be my story.

Daniel: I’ve always been the good son, the good student, living up to my parents’ high expectations. Never the poet. Or the dreamer. But when I see her, I forget about all that. Something about Natasha makes me think that fate has something much more extraordinary in store—for both of us.

The Universe: Every moment in our lives has brought us to this single moment. A million futures lie before us. Which one will come true?


I am wondering if this is just as good as Everything, Everything. Maybe it’s even better?
Anyway I am excited to read it.


things-i-should-have


Goodreads | Bookdepository


From the author of Epic Fail comes the story of Chloe Mitchell, a Los Angeles girl on a quest to find love for her autistic sister, Ivy. Ethan, from Ivy’s class, seems like the perfect match. It’s unfortunate that his older brother, David, is one of Chloe’s least favorite people, but Chloe can deal, especially when she realizes that David is just as devoted to Ethan as she is to Ivy. 

Uncommonly honest and refreshingly funny, this is a story about sisterhood, autism, and first love. Chloe, Ivy, David, and Ethan, who form a quirky and lovable circle, will steal readers’ hearts and remind us all that it’s okay to be a different kind of normal.  


I am so excited for this book. It deals with autism, something I am not that familiar with and want to know more about.



Connect with me elsewhere:

Goodreads | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Diversity spotlight Thursday

There is a lot more diversity in books these days and that’s great. You can read a book about a bisexual character, you can read about mental illness, about what it’s like to be a person of colour and so on. Still though there need to be more diverse books. It’s incredibly important that stories with diverse characters are emphasized. For both children, young adults and adults to read literature and see themselves reflected in what there reading. I myself want to read more diversely. And so I’am participating in the meme created by bookshelves and paperbacks. This is a weekly meme that will feature three books.

1.  A diverse book you have read and enjoyed;
2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read;
3. A diverse book that has not yet been released.


Everything, Everything

everything-everything


Goodreads | Bookdepository


My disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I’m allergic to the world. I don’t leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla.

But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He’s tall, lean and wearing all black—black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, and a black knit cap that covers his hair completely. He catches me looking and stares at me. I stare right back. His name is Olly.

Maybe we can’t predict the future, but we can predict some things. For example, I am certainly going to fall in love with Olly. It’s almost certainly going to be a disaster.


I adored this book. This book was such a quick and enjoyable read. I loved the writing style and the unique plot. Also the characters there were awesome. Here is a full review.


A Tragic Kind of Wonderful

a-tragic-kind-of-wonderful


Goodreads | Bookdepository


For sixteen-year-old Mel Hannigan, bipolar disorder makes life unpredictable. Her latest struggle is balancing her growing feelings in a new relationship with her instinct to keep everyone at arm’s length. And when a former friend confronts Mel with the truth about the way their relationship ended, deeply buried secrets threaten to come out and upend her shaky equilibrium.

As the walls of Mel’s compartmentalized world crumble, she fears the worst—that her friends will abandon her if they learn the truth about what she’s been hiding. Can Mel bring herself to risk everything to find out?


I have already said this once but this book is near and dear to my heart. It’s about mental illness and having different mental problems myself I can relate. At least I hope so.


Radio Silence

radio-silence


Goodreads | Bookdepository


What if everything you set yourself up to be was wrong?

Frances has always been a study machine with one goal, elite university. Nothing will stand in her way; not friends, not a guilty secret – not even the person she is on the inside.

But when Frances meets Aled, the shy genius behind her favourite podcast, she discovers a new freedom. He unlocks the door to Real Frances and for the first time she experiences true friendship, unafraid to be herself. Then the podcast goes viral and the fragile trust between them is broken.

Caught between who she was and who she longs to be, Frances’ dreams come crashing down. Suffocating with guilt, she knows that she has to confront her past…
She has to confess why Carys disappeared…

Meanwhile at uni, Aled is alone, fighting even darker secrets.

It’s only by facing up to your fears that you can overcome them. And it’s only by being your true self that you can find happiness.

Frances is going to need every bit of courage she has.


I am so excited for this book. I don’t know why. Maybe it’s the rave reviews it gets. Maybe it’s the interesting synopsis. For those of you who are fortunate enough to have already read it, how was it?


Connect with me elsewhere:

Goodreads | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Diversity spotlight Thursday

There is a lot more diversity in books these days and that’s great. You can read a book about a bisexual character, you can read about mental illness, about what it’s like to be a person of colour and so on. Still though there need to be more diverse books. It’s incredibly important that stories with diverse characters are emphasized. For both children, young adults and adults to read literature and see themselves reflected in what there reading. I myself want to read more diversely. And so I’am participating in the meme created by bookshelves and paperbacks. This is a weekly meme that will feature three books.

1.  A diverse book you have read and enjoyed;
2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read;
3. A diverse book that has not yet been released.


One

one


Goodreads | Bookdepository



Grace and Tippi. Tippi and Grace. Two sisters. Two hearts. Two dreams. Two lives. But one body.

Grace and Tippi are conjoined twins, joined at the waist, defying the odds of survival for sixteen years. They share everything, and they are everything to each other. They would never imagine being apart. For them, that would be the real tragedy.

But something is happening to them. Something they hoped would never happen. And Grace doesn’t want to admit it. Not even to Tippi.

How long can they hide from the truth—how long before they must face the most impossible choice of their lives?


I absolutely loved this book. I adored it. One of the most emotionally charged novels I’ve ever read. Check out my review, if you want to know more.


Highly Illogical Behavior

higly-illogical-behavior


Goodreads | Bookdepository


Sixteen-year-old Solomon is agoraphobic. He hasn’t left the house in three years, which is fine by him.

Ambitious Lisa desperately wants to get into the second-best psychology program for college (she’s being realistic). But is ambition alone enough to get her in?

Enter Lisa.

Determined to “fix” Sol, Lisa steps into his world, along with her charming boyfriend, Clark, and soon the three form an unexpected bond. But, as Lisa learns more about Sol and he and Clark grow closer and closer, the walls they’ve built around themselves start to collapse and their friendships threaten to do the same.


I have never read a book about somebody that is agoraphobic. I can’t wait to learn more about the disease. I don’t know if I am going to like this since it seems that Lisa is willing to be a friend to Solomon just to get in to a fancy program, but we will see. What did you think of the book?


The Inexplicable Logic of My Life

the-inexplicable-logic-of-my-live


Goodreads | Bookdepository


Sal used to know his place with his adoptive gay father, their loving Mexican-American family, and his best friend, Samantha. But it’s senior year, and suddenly Sal is throwing punches, questioning everything, and realizing he no longer knows himself. If Sal’s not who he thought he was, who is he?


I still have yet to read the first book of Benjamin Alire Sáenz. Since that one gets rave reviews I am willing to bet this one will to. Not that I go and buy a book just based on rave reviews, the synopsis interests me too. What is so interesting about the synopsis? Sal’s sudden change and him questioning everything. The questioning everything part reminds me a lot of The Perks of Being A Wallflower, a book I loved. Anyway, for those of you who were fortunate enough to have already read this, what did you think?


Connect with me elsewhere:

Goodreads | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Diversity spotlight Thursday

There is a lot more diversity in books these days and that’s great. You can read a book about a bisexual character, you can read about mental illness, about what it’s like to be a person of colour and so on. Still though there need to be more diverse books. It’s incredibly important that stories with diverse characters are emphasized. For both children, young adults and adults to read literature and see themselves reflected in what there reading. I myself want to read more diversely. And so I’am participating in the meme created by bookshelves and paperbacks. This is a weekly meme that will feature three books.

1.  A diverse book you have read and enjoyed;
2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read;
3. A diverse book that has not yet been released.


The Perks of Being a Wallflower

the-perks-of-being-a-wallflower


Goodreads | Bookdepository


“I walk around the school hallways and look at the people. I look at the teachers and wonder why they’re here. Not in a mean way. In a curious way. It’s like looking at all the students and wondering who’s had their heart broken that day…or wondering who did the heart breaking and wondering why.”

Charlie is a freshman. And while he’s not the biggest geek in the school, he is by no means popular. Shy, introspective, intelligent beyond his years yet socially awkward, he is a wallflower, caught between trying to live his life and trying to run from it. Charlie is attempting to navigate his way through uncharted territory: the world of first dates and mixed tapes, family dramas and new friends; the world of sex, drugs, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show, when all one requires is that perfect song on that perfect drive to feel infinite. But Charlie can’t stay on the sideline forever. Standing on the fringes of life offers a unique perspective. But there comes a time to see what it looks like from the dance floor.


I know that I loved this book. It’s been awhile but I know that I absolutely loved this book. It’s heart hitting and stays with you for a long time. A very thought provoking story. What else can I say than read it and find out for yourselves.


A Little Life

a-little-life


Goodreads | Bookdepository 


When four classmates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they’re broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their center of gravity. Over the decades, their relationships deepen and darken, tinged by addiction, success, and pride. Yet their greatest challenge, each comes to realize, is Jude himself, by midlife a terrifyingly talented litigator yet an increasingly broken man, his mind and body scarred by an unspeakable childhood, and haunted by what he fears is a degree of trauma that he’ll not only be unable to overcome—but that will define his life forever.


I hear this is heartbreakingly beautiful. I hear it’s a must read. That what I must, I shall do.
But seriously, I am dying to read this. There have been so many people that talked about this book. In case you read it, what did you think?


10 Things I Can See from Here

10-things-i-can-see-from-here


Goodreads | Bookdepository


Think positive.
Don’t worry; be happy.
Keep calm and carry on.

Maeve has heard it all before. She’s been struggling with severe anxiety for a long time, and as much as she wishes it was something she could just talk herself out of, it’s not. She constantly imagines the worst, composes obituaries in her head, and is always ready for things to fall apart. To add to her troubles, her mom—the only one who really gets what Maeve goes through—is leaving for six months, so Maeve will be sent to live with her dad in Vancouver.

Vancouver brings a slew of new worries, but Maeve finds brief moments of calm (as well as even more worries) with Salix, a local girl who doesn’t seem to worry about anything. Between her dad’s wavering sobriety, her very pregnant stepmom insisting on a home birth, and her bumbling courtship with Salix, this summer brings more catastrophes than even Maeve could have foreseen. Will she be able to navigate through all the chaos to be there for the people she loves?


This sounds really interesting to me because it’s about a girl with anxiety. I, myself, have a severe case of anxiety and would like to read books that I can relate to. To see myself reflected on the page. Why is this so important to me? I honestly can’t find the words.


Connect with me elsewhere:

Goodreads | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Diversity spotlight Thursday

There is a lot more diversity in books these days and that’s great. You can read a book about a bisexual character, you can read about mental illness, about what it’s like to be a person of colour and so on. Still though there need to be more diverse books. It’s incredibly important that stories with diverse characters are emphasized. For both children, young adults and adults to read literature and see themselves reflected in what there reading. I myself want to read more diversely. And so I’am participating in the meme created by bookshelves and paperbacks. This is a weekly meme that will feature three books.

1.  A diverse book you have read and enjoyed;
2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read;
3. A diverse book that has not yet been released.



Every heart a doorway

every-heart-a-doorway


Goodreads | Bookdepository



Eleanor West’s Home for Wayward Children
No Solicitations
No Visitors
No Guests

Children have always disappeared under the right conditions; slipping through the shadows under a bed or at the back of a wardrobe, tumbling down rabbit holes and into old wells, and emerging somewhere… else.

But magical lands have little need for used-up miracle children.

Nancy tumbled once, but now she’s back. The things she’s experienced… they change a person. The children under Miss West’s care understand all too well. And each of them is seeking a way back to their own fantasy world.

But Nancy’s arrival marks a change at the Home. There’s a darkness just around each corner, and when tragedy strikes, it’s up to Nancy and her new-found schoolmates to get to the heart of the matter.

No matter the cost. 


I adore this book. It’s fantastic. There is a great cast of characters. Each and every one of them is fleshed out well. There’s a terrific plot. The writing is beautiful. Do I need to say more? You might ask yourself why is this diverse though? Because, for example, the main character is asexual. Also, it has a side character that is transsexual. I’ve already mentioned a couple of reasons why I love this book, there are still two things I haven’t discussed yet. I love the fact that the identity of the main character is confirmed on the page and actually discussed. As well as the  identity  of the side character. Also the discussing of these particular characters happens in such a fascinating and beautiful way.


More happy than not

more-happy-then-not


Goodreads | Bookdepository



In the months after his father’s suicide, it’s been tough for 16-year-old Aaron Soto to find happiness again–but he’s still gunning for it. With the support of his girlfriend Genevieve and his overworked mom, he’s slowly remembering what that might feel like. But grief and the smile-shaped scar on his wrist prevent him from forgetting completely. 

When Genevieve leaves for a couple of weeks, Aaron spends all his time hanging out with this new guy, Thomas. Aaron’s crew notices, and they’re not exactly thrilled. But Aaron can’t deny the happiness Thomas brings or how Thomas makes him feel safe from himself, despite the tensions their friendship is stirring with his girlfriend and friends. Since Aaron can’t stay away from Thomas or turn off his newfound feelings for him, he considers turning to the Leteo Institute’s revolutionary memory-alteration procedure to straighten himself out, even if it means forgetting who he truly is. 

Why does happiness have to be so hard?


This book is described as twisty, gritty and profoundly moving. Those are the exact words I would use when describing this book, just by reading the synopsis. You just know by reading it that it’s going to be heart hitting. I, myself, can’t wait to read this book. It’s going on my tbr for the month of April.


When Dimple met Rishi 

when-dimple-met-richie


Goodreads | Bookdepository



Dimple Shah has it all figured out. With graduation behind her, she’s more than ready for a break from her family, from Mamma’s inexplicable obsession with her finding the “Ideal Indian Husband.” Ugh. Dimple knows they must respect her principles on some level, though. If they truly believed she needed a husband right now, they wouldn’t have paid for her to attend a summer program for aspiring web developers…right?

Rishi Patel is a hopeless romantic. So when his parents tell him that his future wife will be attending the same summer program as him—wherein he’ll have to woo her—he’s totally on board. Because as silly as it sounds to most people in his life, Rishi wants to be arranged, believes in the power of tradition, stability, and being a part of something much bigger than himself.

The Shahs and Patels didn’t mean to start turning the wheels on this “suggested arrangement” so early in their children’s lives, but when they noticed them both gravitate toward the same summer program, they figured, Why not?

Dimple and Rishi may think they have each other figured out. But when opposites clash, love works hard to prove itself in the most unexpected ways. 


This sounds like such a fun, light-hearted read. It’s definitely something other then what I usually go for, especially when it comes to contemporaries. I usually seek out the grittier, heart wrenching ones but this spoke to me. Why? Because it’s about an arranged marriage, and it’s nice to see an arranged marriage that isn’t forced upon people. You see a different side to arranged marriages. We only ever hear that arranged marriages are bad because the are forced upon people. I, admit, have thought that for a long time.  But that’s not always the case. When I learned about this fact, it was an eye-opener. I hope this book can be an eye-opener for others. 


Connect with me elsewhere:

Goodreads | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Diversity spotlight Thursday

There is a lot more diversity in books these days and that’s great. You can read a book about a bisexual character, you can read about mental illness, about what it’s like to be a person of colour and so on. Still though there need to be more diverse books. It’s incredibly important that stories with diverse characters are emphasized. For both children, young adults and adults to read literature and see themselves reflected in what there reading. I myself want to read more diversely. And so I’am participating in the meme created by bookshelves and paperbacks. This is a weekly meme that will feature three books.

1.  A diverse book you have read and enjoyed;
2. A diverse book that has already been released but you have not read;
3. A diverse book that has not yet been released.


 

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda

simon-versus-the-homo-sapiens-agenda


Goodreads | Bookdepository



Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight. Now Simon is actually being blackmailed: if he doesn’t play wingman for class clown Martin, his sexual identity will become everyone’s business. Worse, the privacy of Blue, the pen name of the boy he’s been emailing, will be compromised.

With some messy dynamics emerging in his once tight-knit group of friends, and his email correspondence with Blue growing more flirtatious every day, Simon’s junior year has suddenly gotten all kinds of complicated. Now, change-averse Simon has to find a way to step out of his comfort zone before he’s pushed out—without alienating his friends, compromising himself, or fumbling a shot at happiness with the most confusing, adorable guy he’s never met.


I absolute adored this book. It’s been awhile since i read this, so i can’t get in to detail but  just know that it’s cute, so so cute. If the synopsis doesn’t peak your interest then maybe  my telling you that this book is great because it’s a positive book about a gay character. What I mean by that  is that Simon accepts himself for who he is, he doesn’t struggle with the fact that he’s gay. He is just a boy who is in love with another boy. And that’s refreshing to read. Don’t get my wrong I love reading about the trials and tribulations that people go through to accept themselves but I find it refreshing to read about someone just being in love with someone else and how that love story is portrait.


 

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

aristotle-and-dante


Goodreads | Bookdepository



Aristotle is an angry teen with a brother in prison. Dante is a know-it-all who has an unusual way of looking at the world. When the two meet at the swimming pool, they seem to have nothing in common. But as the loners start spending time together, they discover that they share a special friendship—the kind that changes lives and lasts a lifetime. And it is through this friendship that Ari and Dante will learn the most important truths about themselves and the kind of people they want to be.


I  don’t know much about this book except what I read in de description on Goodreads. The many 5 star ratings it has been given pressed me to read this. What do you guys think about this book?


 

The Hate u Give

 

the-hate-you-give-us


Goodreads | Bookdepository



Sixteen-year-old Starr lives in two worlds: the poor neighbourhood where she was born and raised and her posh high school in the suburbs. The uneasy balance between them is shattered when Starr is the only witness to the fatal shooting of her unarmed best friend, Khalil, by a police officer. Now what Starr says could destroy her community. It could also get her killed.


This is one of my most anticipated books of the year. It sounds so good. Just read the description above. If your not swayed by that synopsis then i don’t know what will sway you. For those who already read this, what did you think?

 


Connect with me elsewhere:

Goodreads | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter